THE JACK THE RIPPER WALKS - STEP BY STEP

The White Hart Pub - First stop on our Jack the Ripper Tour.

NO HYPE - NO FALSE CLAIMS JUST A STEP BY STEP GUIDE

TO OUR JACK THE RIPPER TOUR OF LONDON

We honestly believe that our combination of expert guides, a carefully planned and atmospheric route, together with the exclusive Victorian photographs that we show you, help make ours the best of all the Jack the Ripper Tour in London.

We believe in our tour and we believe in the route that it takes.

To prove how atmospheric and comprehensive it is we will take you step by step around our tour route here and now on our website.

Below you will see photographs of each stop on our Jack the Ripper Tour of London and you will be able to read why each destination is significant to the story. We hope that this will help you to make an informed decision by seeing for yourselves the places that you will visit if you decide to join our tour.

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FOLLOW US NOW AS WE ENTER THE LABYRINTH

As the East End Shadows lengthen and the night grows darker, our world famous Jack the Ripper tour sets off into the crooked, cobbled alleyways of Whitechapel and Spitalfields to hunt the killer who in 1888 brought terror and panic to the very streets through which you will walk.

THE JOURNEY BEGINS - HERE AT THE EPICENTRE OF THE MURDERS

From the start of your evening you will find yourself exploring places that have changed very little since those long ago nights when this entire neighbourhood was gripped by fear as the ripper's reign of terror gained momentum and the police fought a desperate battle to hunt him down before he killed again.

We start our Jack the Ripper walk at Aldgate East Underground Station because it is at the very heart of the murder territory.

The first thing we will do is pass around a photograph of the view from our starting point thatWhitechapel High Street 1888. was taken in 1890.

It shows the direction you will be heading in and helps you build up a mental image of what Whitechapel High Street (where our tour begins) looked like just after the Jack the Ripper murders had occurred.

The people you see in the photograph who are walking along the thoroughfare that you are about to walk along were the people who actually lived through the autumn of terror and, who knows, one of them may even have been Jack the Ripper himself!

You will see the spire of St Mary's church in the distance. This building was lime-washed in the Middle Ages and was thus the "White Chapel" that gave its name to the area.

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THIS ARCHWAY IS OUR GATEWAY TO JACK THE RIPPER'S LONDON

Within seconds of the start of your tour you will have turned beneath a sinister arch to find an even more sinister Gunthorpe Street Arch.alleyway stretching ahead of you. You will be following in the footsteps of Martha Tabram who, on the 7th August 1888, led a stranger under this very arch, walked along this cobbled thoroughfare, and was never seen alive again.

In the early hours of that same morning her body was discovered further along the alleyway. We take you to the site of her murder and present you with the evidence for and against her having being the first victim of Jack the Ripper.

To give you something of an idea of just how atmospheric this old alleyway is, just take a look at the photograph to the right.

You really will feel as if you've stepped back in time as you walk along the very cobbles that Martha and her murderer passed over in the early hours of that long ago morning.

As one member of our tour recently put it "it seemed as though I had stepped onto a movie set, but then I realised with a shudder that I was actually following in the footsteps of Martha Tabram to the actual spot where her murder occurred, and that really did send a shiver down my spine."

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THE SECOND STOP ON OUR JACK THE RIPPER LONDON TOUR

We next make our way round to Osborne Street. In 1888 this was an extremely sinister place and it was here in the early hours of April 3rd 1888 that a lady named Emma Smith was attacked by a gang of youths. Her injuries were so severe that she died of them the next morning.

Emma Smith probably wasn't a victim of Jack the Ripper. But her death was significant in that in the Osborn Street.aftermath of her killing the police opened their file on the Whitechapel Murders, a file that by the end of the year would also include the acknowledged victims of Jack the Ripper.

Osborne Street, however, does feature in the story of Mary Nichols, who was murdered in the early hours of August 31st 1888, and who is now widely regarded as being the first definite victim of Jack the Ripper.

A friend of hers, Emily Holland, met her outside a shop on Osborne Street around an hour and twenty minutes before her body was discovered about half a mile away in Bucks Row.

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THE NEXT STOP ON OUR JACK THE RIPPER WALK

We stroll along Brick Lane, a colourful and vibrant street that is lined by some of the best Indian Restaurants in London. Pausing at its junction with Thrawl Street, we show a photograph of Thrawl Street as it was in 1888 when The Frying Pan Pub.it was renowned as one of the worst streets in London.

It was at a lodging house in Thrawl Street that Mary Nichols was living at the time of her murder. Indeed she was ejected from the premises because she didn't have the necessary four pence to pay for her bed for the night.

Mary seems to have obtained some money (probably by resorting to prostitution) but she drank it away in the Frying Pan Pub. This pub still stands, although it is now an Indian Restaurant.

But you will be asked to look up at its top storey, and there in brick relief you will see two crossed Frying Pans and its original Victorian name "Ye Frying Pan." How's that for a time capsule?

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ONWARDS AND FORWARDS

Now our tour enters a truly magical enclave of old buildings and ancient streets that really have survived the ages.

The houses that you are about to pass were built for the Huguenot master silk weavers in the 18th century.

But, beforeThe Brick Lane Mosque. we reach them, we pass a magnificent structure that stands at the junction of Brick Lane and Fournier Street.

Built in the 1740's as a Huguenot chapel and schoolroom, it became a Methodist Chapel in the early 19th century; a Synagogue in the 1890's; and a Mosque in the 1970's. It really does reflect the changing demographics that have helped make this area such a rich and culturally diverse neighbourhood.

It stands on the threshold of a knot of streets that still possess the ambience of the 18th and 19th centuries.

As mentioned earlier these houses were built in the 18th century for the Huguenot master silk weavers. Old houses on the Jack the Ripper Tour.

Every one of them still has the high attic windows that provided the light for the workshops in which these weavers laboured.

But in the mid-19th century the government of the day opened up the weaving trade to cheap foreign imports. The Huguenots found their business devastated and, as a consequence, they began to move out. Slum landlords then took over the properties and turned them into either common lodging houses or slum properties.

They thus provided the back cloth against which the Jack the Ripper saga was played out. In the last twenty or so years these houses have been re-discovered and gentrified, and many of them have been restored to their 18th century splendour.

Your walk through these streets will be truly memorable and in winter months the smell of wood fires burning in the grates of these stunning properties will further fuel the feeling that you have stepped into a bygone age.

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WE VISIT THE SECOND JACK THE RIPPER MURDER SITE

This lovely knot of old and atmospheric streets will bring us to Hanbury Street, site of the second Jack the Ripper murder.

At around 5.30am on the morning of September 8th 1888 Mrs Elizabeth Long turned into Hanbury Hanbury Street - second Jack the Ripper Murder site.Street - one street along from Princelet Street - and saw Annie Chapman standing outside number 29 talking to a man. Mrs Long later told the coroner that it was not unusual to see couples talking on the street at such an early hour and so, finding nothing suspicious about this particular couple, she passed them by and continued on her way to nearby Spitalfields Market.

Thirty minutes later John Davis, an elderly resident of number 29 Hanbury Street, came down the stairs, walked along the passage and opened the back door. He saw a sight that sent him reeling back in horror. Staggering through the passage he threw open the front door and fell into the street where he called three labourers to his assistance. The men followed him through the house, looked out of the door and gazed down onto the horrifically mutilated body of Annie Chapman.

The south side of Hanbury Street is much as it was in 1888, and we point out the significant buildings that have survived. The north side of the street, which included the murder site, was demolished in the late 1960's and has now been replaced by a rather unsightly brewery building.

But we show you photographs of Hanbury street as it was and of number 29 itself, including a rare one of the actual staircase down which John Davis came to make his grisly discovery.

We also discuss the riots that this murder caused as the mob went on the rampage seeking scapegoats to blame for the atrocity.

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AN OLD AND ATMOSPHERIC ALLEYWAY

From Puma CourtHanbury Street the Jack the Ripper Tour of London backtracks along Wilkes Street.

Once again the buildings have survived more or less intact and really do pitch you back to that long ago era when terror stalked the night and the people who lived here walked in fear.

We then turn into Puma Court, which in 1888 was known as Red Lion Court, and which typifies the narrow alleyways and dark passageways that riddled the district in 1888.

It was to places like this that the Victorian prostitutes would lead their clients and in so doing made it possible for a lone assassin, such as Jack the Ripper, to murder them and then melt away unseen in to the night.

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NEXT, WE WELL AND TRULY SPIRIT YOU BACK IN TIME

Turning along Commercial Street we pause outside Christchurch Spitalfields. This soaring edifice of gleamingChristchurch Spitalfields white stone still dominates its surroundings just as it did in 1888.

Every one of Jack the Ripper's victims, every one of the police officers who investigated the case, every one of the local residents, and even, possibly, Jack the Ripper himself would have gazed up at this prominent local landmark on an almost daily basis. It really is a silent witness to that long ago autumn of fear, panic and despair.

Opposite stands the Ten Bells Pub, just as it did in 1888. Across from the pub is Spitalfields Market, which opened in 1887 and was barely a year old when the Jack the Ripper scare was at its height.

We will show you a photograph of the spot on which you are standing taken a little after the murders. You will see both the Ten Bells and Spitalfields Market as they looked then. You will see the horse drawn carts and carriages jostling with each other to force their way along what was then a bustling and crowded thoroughfare.

You will see the, now demolished, Britannia Pub which stood on the corner of Dorset Street, "the Worst Street in London" according to the Daily Mail. It was here that Mary Kelly, the last victim of Jack the Ripper lived, and you will Commercial Street 1888.picture her walking past the church in the early hours of the morning of the 9th of November 1888, and meeting with a labourer whom she asked for a "tanner" (sixpence). On learning he had no money she observed, "well I'll just have to find it some other way then, won't I ?'

The labourer watched her move off along Commercial Street, saw her meet with a man, watched them laughing together, and then he followed the couple as Mary Kelly led the stranger to Dorset Street.

You will follow in their footsteps from Commercial Street to Miller's Court, the place where Mary Kelly rented a ground floor room and the place where her body was discovered later that day.

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JACK THE RIPPER'S MOST GRUESOME MURDER

Mary Kelly lived in Miller's Court, off Dorset Street. Dorset Street was long ago pulled down and an unsightly car park and ugly industrial units now line what remains of it.

But, to help you get the feel of what this notorious East End street was like, your guide Dorset Street 1888will pass around a photograph of it taken in 1902 for Jack London's book The people of the Abyss.

You will see that the houses along the left hand side of the street have lamps outside them.

Each one of these was a Common Lodging House where as many as 260 men, women and children bedded down each night.

Here you begin to realise how the sheer overcrowding in the neighbourhood made it an utterly thankless task for the police to try and hunt down one homicidal maniac in an area that was bursting at the seams with unsavoury criminals, many of whom were capable of equally despicable acts of violent crime.

It Miller's Court - Jack the Ripper Murder Site.was under one of these lamps that the aforementioned witness stood and watched Mary Kelly lead the stranger through the arch and into Miller's Court.

Although the court was demolished in the 1920's, your guide will show you a photograph of it taken just before the developers moved in. As the picture circulates, your guide will point out that, although Miller's Court itself has long since vanished, the width of its entrance, the very threshold over which Mary Kelly stepped with the stranger, is still there.

Using the photograph you will be able to gaze down at that entrance and see for yourself exactly what it looked like. You may even find yourself picturing Mary Kelly crossing this very spot in the company of her killer unaware of the horrendous fate that awaits her.

This section of the tour really does send a shiver of anticipation around the Jack the Ripper Tour groups as they explore London with us, and the participants often huddle closer at this point.

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JACK THE RIPPER'S ONLY CLUE

One of the main problems faced by the police in their hunt for Jack the Ripper was that the killer left no clues behind at the scenes of his murders. Their problems were compounded by the fact that the murderer was not knownJack the Ripper's clue was left in a doorway of this old building. to his victims. He simply struck in the dead of night in out of the way places and then just melted away into the night. As Dr Robert Anderson, the head of the Metropolitan Police's Criminal Investigation Department, and one of the highest ranking officers on the case put it "for one murder to occur where the killer leaves no clues behind is unusual, but for a series of crimes to occur where the killer leaves no clues behind is unheard of." Yet this is exactly what Jack the Ripper was doing.

Except, that is, on the 30th September 1888 when, having murdered Catherine Eddowes in Mitre Square, the killer left behind his one and only clue in a doorway on nearby Goulston Street.

We visit that doorway and discuss the significance of the clue. We also point out the wall on which a sinister message was scrawled and reveal who it was that the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Sir Charles Warren, was protecting when he ordered the message to be erased before a photograph of it could be taken. We will ponder Warren's motive for ordering the destruction of what another high ranking officer believed was a hugely important clue.

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THE NIGHT OF THE DOUBLE MURDER

The 30th of September was a hugely significant date in the hunt for Jack the Ripper. It was in the early hours of the morning that Elizabeth Stride, Jack the Ripper's third victim, was murdered in Berner Street; and Catherine Eddowes, Jack the Ripper's fourth victim, was butchered in Mitre Square.

As a result the 30th September quickly became known as "the night of the double murder" or the "double event."

We pause on the threshold of the City of London and show you a photograph of Berner Street 1888.Berner Street as it was in 1888.

We point out exactly where the murder site was on the photo and tell of an extremely important witness who may well have seen the early stages of Elizabeth Stride's murder.

We then cross in to the City of London and make our way into Mitre Square via the passage outside which Catherine was seen chatting with a man by three witnesses.

Fifteen minutes later, in what the attending doctor described as being "the darkest corner Mitre Squareof Mitre Square," beat officer PC Watkins of the City Police discovered her horribly mutilated body.

You will stand on the exact spot where that discovery was made and hear of the frenzied police activity in the immediate aftermath.

We will show you old photographs of the square showing how it looked from all angles and point out Jack the Ripper's probable escape route from the scene of his crime.

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WE WILL THEN UNMASK THE RIPPER (WELL GIVE YOU A THEORY!)

Finally, we spend five or so minutes pulling together all the fascinating threads of the mystery and reveal to you who the two leading officers on the case appear to have believed the killer was.

You will learn the probable reason why the police didn't make their suspicions public, and will be told the likely fate that befell Jack the Ripper. Your guide will then escort you the little distance to Aldgate Underground Station where, safely ensconced on the train, you will be able to sit back and ponder the incredible story that has been played out before you in a little under two hours.

You will be able to think back on the hidden alleyways and cobblestone streets through which you journeyed.

But, above all else, you will now know the facts, the true facts, and only the true facts about a case that has baffled crime historians for over a hundred years, and which will have provided a window through which you will have gazed back onto a long ago autumn, when a lone figure prowled the very streets that you spent the night exploring, and really did succeed in shaking the British establishment to its very core.

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WE WALK YOU TO AN UNDERGROUND STATION AT THE END

At the end of the evening we won't leave you stranded in the depths of Spitalfields and Whitechapel. Because we start at Aldgate East we end in the City of London, a short distance away from Aldgate Underground Station. You guide will be happy to walk you to the station which is, literally two minutes walk away from where our tour ends.

SO THERE IT IS YOUR STEP BY STEP GUIDE

Of course the commentary on this page is a fraction of what you will actually hear on the tour itself.

You will, for example, see and peruse the letter from which Jack the Ripper gained his name. You will hear of the injuries suffered by the victims, and learn a great deal about the fascinating, if often sordid, history of the streets through which you will walk.

You have seen on this page genuine photographs of the places that we feature on our tour, including several that other Jack the Ripper Tours don't go anywhere near.

We have done this to show you that our tour is comprehensive and includes far more than the average Jack the Ripper Walk.

DON'T SETTLE FOR ANYTHING LESS THAN THE FULL STORY

So don't settle for anything less than the complete Jack the Ripper experience. An experience that, from the off, takes you into the streets, alleyways and passageways against which the story unfolded.

This may be your only chance to investigate this fascinating subject up close and personal. So be sure that you join the expert led Jack the Ripper Tour of London to get the real story of the people and events that together add up to the greatest whodunit in history.

AND ONE LAST TIME

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THERE'S NO MORE TO BE SAID!